Search Excellence

  1. Roles in the Search Process
  2. Position Descriptions
  3. Recruiting
  4. Screening Applicants
  5. Interviewing
  6. Reference Checking & More
  7. Making an Offer
  8. Communicating with Applicants
  9. Integrating the New Employees
  10. Questions or Concerns?

Recruitment and Selection Policy

Oregon State University will pursue an active recruitment and selection process to assure the availability of qualified applicants to meet its employment needs and to assure equal employment opportunity through affirmative action. Success is demonstrated by recruitment that actively includes people from historically under-represented (underutilized) groups, along with the selection and appointment of the most highly qualified candidates. Over time, fair and active recruitment and selection practices should result in OSU workforce demographics that mirror the demographics of the qualified applicant populations from which positions are filled.

OSU engages in active recruitment and selection processes based on affirmative action principles in order to assure equal employment opportunities. At each step in the recruitment and selection process, search committee members are asked to review their processes and practices to identify and eliminate unintended bias, and actively work to include applicants who historically have been excluded. The intent of this review is to ensure that no individual or group is discriminated against on the basis of a protected status, such as race, color, religion, national origin, citizenship, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, or qualified veteran status.  

Hiring managers should seek advice and consultation on this policy and procedure from their Business Center Human Resources Office. The Business Center Human Resources Office will consult with Office of Human Resources (Employment Services Unit), Academic Affairs, Office of the General Counsel, and the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access as appropriate.

Hiring managers seeking advice and approval to conduct a waiver of search (for an unclassified position) – or to obtain general guidance and strategies for equal opportunity, affirmative action, and diversity in the search process – should contact the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access.

Management/Retention of Recruitment and Selection Documents

Documents related to the recruitment and selection process must remain confidential, and only shared with the search committee chair, committee members, and the search administrator (person managing the administrative functions of the process).  The HIRING MANAGER is responsible for gathering ALL documents related to the search process, including committee notes, evaluations, and recommendations.  Documents must be retained at the department level for three years after the date of appointment and then destroyed.

Hiring Philosophy and Principles

Oregon State University Hiring Philosophy

“The individuals comprising our extended university community are the source of our creativity, reputation, and vitality” (OSU mission statement). Every position at OSU is critical to our ability to achieve our shared institutional objectives. Each time we hire a staff member, administrator, faculty member or student employee, we are given a chance to enhance this community and to demonstrate our university’s values of accountability, diversity, respect, and responsibility. We do this by using fair, legal, inclusive, and effective hiring practices that support and comply with OSU policy and procedures in a way that is mindful of climate, culture and diversity, and by affirming the unique qualities of each individual throughout the hiring process.

Principles that guide our hiring practices:
  • Maintain confidentiality: Keep search committee deliberations, applicant information, and applicant identities confidential. Search committee members offer a wide array of perspectives to each search and selection process. They are expected to work together to bring these perspectives to consensus by ultimately producing a list of finalists that each member of the committee can support. When a committee member reveals selective details of the search committee’s thinking and discussion as they work towards that outcome, s/he may misrepresent the committee or damage the reputations of committee members and applicants. Similarly, an applicant can be irrevocably damaged by premature announcement of her/his candidacy for the position you intend to fill. Maintaining strict confidentiality in every search is a “must” for the hiring units, the candidates, the appointees, and the University’s reputation.
  • Use best practices in search and selection: Years of research and practical experience support the strategies to be utilized by OSU hiring managers and search committee members throughout the recruitment and selection process. The techniques outlined in this manual comply with relevant laws, rules, regulations, and contractual obligations, and align with the University’s mission and vision as a diverse public land, sea, space, and sun-grant institution.
  • Recognize and avoid or counteract bias: Present-day research demonstrates that unconscious cognitive bias and unintentional structural biases, even on the part of open-minded, well-intentioned decision-makers, unfairly disadvantages qualified applicants. We all have unconscious biases and cognitive schemas that we use to make sense of the world around us, but we are largely unaware of them. When we accept that we have unconscious cognitive biases, and commit to addressing them through self-awareness, committee discussions, and structural enhancements to the process, we reduce the chances that someone will be harmed by bias in the search process.

Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity

Affirmative Action can be summarized as those result-oriented actions and good faith efforts in which OSU (as an agency that contracts with the federal government) engages to ensure equality of opportunity in our employment processes. It refers to concrete steps in recruitment and hiring designed to minimize the present effects of past discrimination and unintentional present-day biases.

The written Affirmative Action Plan produced each year by the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access (EOA) incorporates a set of specific and results-oriented practices, including good-faith efforts to address significant underrepresentation of women or people of color in particular job groups, and to minimize the present effects of past discrimination and present cognitive bias. OSU hiring managers, search chairs, and search committee members are responsible for implementing OSU’s good faith efforts by making conscious efforts throughout the search process to be inclusive and to offset the effects of bias.

The Office of Equal Opportunity and Access completes an Incumbency vs. Availability analysis as part of the Affirmative Action Plan. The analysis compares the percentage of persons of color and women in OSU’s workforce (and the jobs they occupy) to the availability of women and people of color in the appropriate labor area. If the analysis shows underrepresentation of women or people of color in certain job groups, then extra recruitment efforts must be taken to ensure that these protected-class members are well-represented in applicant pools for positions in those job groups. These include outreach efforts and advertising in publications that promote placement of women and people of color, etc.

The goal of an Affirmative Action Plan is genuine equality of opportunity in employment. Selection is based upon the ability of an applicant to do the work. The Plan neither advocates nor condones the selection of an unqualified applicant. Applicants are not selected on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, or other identity characteristics (a common misconception).

OSU extends the benefit of our affirmative action practices to individuals who self-identify as qualifying veterans (in this case, qualifying veterans means all veterans or disabled veterans who served on active duty with the Armed Forces of the United States and were honorably discharged).

The EOA website at http://eoa.oregonstate.edu/recruitment-and-hiring contains resources related to the implementation of affirmative action and equal opportunity practices in the search process. Hiring managers and search committee members/chairs are advised to obtain general guidance and strategies for equal opportunity, affirmative action, and diversity in the search process from the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access.

Definitions

Academic Rank

The category assigned to unclassified employees in the academic service, whether the service is teaching, research, extension, administration, or other. Academic rank is distinguished from professional faculty without rank and includes Professor, Associate Professor, Assistant Professor, Instructor, Senior Instructor, Research Associate, Faculty Research Assistant, Senior Faculty Research Assistant, and Lecturer. Refer to http://oregonstate.edu/admin/aa/faculty-handbook-contents.

Accelerated Search

A search lasting two weeks (13 calendar days) or less in duration; requires approval from the business center HR Manager.

Affirmative Action Search Advocate

Appointed by the Dean or Department Head/Chair and trained by the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access, and the AASA ensures accountability to OSU’s equal opportunity principles, affirmative action practices, and diversity values. The AASA helps committees recognize the potential for specific cognitive and structural biases in the search process.

Annual Tenure (Tenure-Track) Appointment

An appointment given to faculty employed at .50 FTE or more who are serving in a probationary status for indefinite tenure.

Classified Position

A position represented by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Local 503, Oregon Public Employees Union (OPEU) and the Graphic Communication International Union (GCIU).

Collective Bargaining Agreement  

A formal written agreement entered into between a union and the Oregon State Board of HigherEducation, acting by and through the Oregon University System (OUS) on behalf of Oregon State University and other universities within OUS, which provides the terms and conditions of employment for employees covered by the agreement. Oregon State University has collective bargaining agreements with the following unions: Coalition of Graduate Employees (CGE), and Service Employees International Union, Local 503, OPEI (SEIU).

Continuous Recruitment Pool

A recruitment that remains open on a continuous basis, making it possible for a hiring department to immediately identify qualified candidates for a vacancy.

Fixed-Term  Appointment

An appointment that is limited to a specified period of time (usually no more than one year or until the end of the current fiscal year) with stated beginning and ending dates.

Hiring Manager

An individual who has the authority to recruit and appoint new employees.

Indefinite Tenure

Appointment made by the President in witness of the university’s formal decision that the faculty member has demonstrated such professional competence that the university will not henceforth terminate employment except for cause, financial exigency, or program or department reductions.

Job Analysis

The process of investigating the duties, tasks, responsibilities, functions and purpose of the position for which one intends to fill.

Online Position Descriptions andRecruitment System

OSU system that automates the management of position descriptions and the recruitment processes.

OSCAR

The Oregon State Central Administrative Resource website that provides secured access to online tasks for recruitment and hiring.

Professional Faculty

An employee working in an academic, student, or other administrative support position with professional titles, and without an assigned rank.

Significant Under representation

The employment of women and/or persons of color in a particular group at a significantly lower rate than would reasonably be expected given the availability in the qualified population in the geographic region/labor area for the job group.  Affirmative Action Placement Goals are created annually for each College/Unit on campus to assist in avoiding under representation.

Veteran Consideration

OSU’s hiring process extends the benefit of our established affirmative action practices  to individuals who self-identify as qualifying veterans.  A “qualifying veteran” is a veteran or disabled veteran who has been honorably discharged from U.S. Military service.  All postings offer applicants the opportunity to self-identify veteran status.  Special consideration will be given to qualifying veterans when the qualifying veteran applicant meets the minimum qualifications for the position for which she or he has applied, and when the veteran’s application materials show sufficient evidence of any transferrable skills required and requested by the hiring unit.

Waiver of Search

An exception to the regular unclassified recruitment and selection process, granted by the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access. To review the Policy and Procedure for Waiver of the Regular Search Process (Unclassified Employees), go to website: http://eoa.oregonstate.edu/search-exceptions.

Roles in the Search Process

Forming and Charging a Search Committee (The Hiring Manager’s Responsibility)

Before the hiring manager gathers and charges a search committee with their duties and obligations, the following important issues must be addressed:

  • What will the hiring manager’s role be throughout the search process?  Will s/he be there primarily to guide the committee in its efforts?  Or, will s/he serve as a member of the committee?  If the hiring manager decides on the latter, s/he must use caution and avoid dominating the committee activities in such a way that the committee ultimately feels that their overall purpose was only to serve as a rubber stamp approval for the hiring manager’s personal hiring preferences.
  • What is the time frame for filling the vacant position?  What date should the new employee be “sitting in the chair” performing the job duties?  Remember to build in enough time for the following events to occur:
    • Once a committee is formed and charged, the position description must be finalized and entered into the Online Position Description and Recruiting System. This work may have already begun by the time the committee is formed, but ideally the committee should participate in a final review of the position description.
    • Allow a minimum of seven to ten business days for the Business Center Human Resources Office to review and approve the position description.
    • Allow a minimum of three to five business days for the Business Center Human Resources Office to create, approve, and post the vacancy to the Online Position Description and Recruiting System.
    • Allow the search committee adequate time to screen applications before determining which applicants to invite for interview. Two to three weeks is considered a reasonable amount of time, given the challenges of bringing the committee members together and the time it takes to screen applications.
    • Allow seven to fourteen business days for interviews to be conducted.
    • Allow a minimum of seven business days for the committee to evaluate the interviews conducted.
    • Based on the hiring manager’s instructions to the search committee, s/he may be involved in interviewing the top candidates for the position. Other constituents within the college, department, or unit (Dean, Department Chair, etc) may also be invited to meet the finalists. This process can take a minimum of five business days.
    • Will the finalists be required to give professional presentations to faculty and/or staff members?  If so, this can typically be accomplished in five business days.
    • Once an offer of employment is made, there could be some “negotiation” time to build into the process before an offer is officially accepted.
    • Allow adequate time for the appointees to complete their employment obligations to their current employer, as appropriate.
  • How large should the committee be?  It is recommended that search committees for academic or professional faculty positions have five to seven members.  A committee that is too large diminishes each person’s sense of belonging, and member contribution falls off sharply. Consider that the size of a committee should reflect the importance of the vacant position (the more important the position, the greater the number of committee members). For classified staff or entry level professional faculty positions, three to five members is recommended in order to bring diverse perspectives to the selection process.
  • Will the hiring manager involve the search chair in selection of the search committee?  At this point in the process, the hiring manager should begin compiling a “short list” of possible names for appointment to the committee.
  • Will an Affirmative Action Associate be invited to speak with the entire committee regarding unconscious cognitive bias and diversity in the search process?
  • Will an Affirmative Action Search Advocate be assigned to work with the search committee throughout the search process?
Search Committee Composition

For the hiring manager, the place to start in committee-building is with the chair. No other person will play as significant a role in the process:  the chair sets the tone and pace of the committee work. Their work commitment will be two or three times that of other committee members.

The chair must be someone the hiring manager trusts. The qualities one wants in a search committee chair are those sought for all committee members, plus a few special qualities:  excellent communication skills, abilities to motivate and keep a group on track, and quick and efficient with paperwork.

Search committee members should be savvy about people – discerners of talent who know and insist upon high-quality work. They must possess sound independent judgment, personal integrity, and the ability to maintain confidentiality. Committees should be diverse in terms of gender and race in order to bring diverse choices and perspectives to the committee work. Each member should possess technical expertise sufficient to make astute comparisons among applicants. Each member should be willing and free enough to assume the committees assignments.

Once the chair is appointed, s/he and the hiring manager can recruit and form the full search committee. Committee members should have interest in the outcome of the search – stakeholders in the success of the appointee. In addition to faculty members, one should consider inviting students, support staff, retirees and constituents within the community that will be working with the person appointed to the position. It is always recommended that an Affirmative Action Advocate participate on the committee as well, and that an Affirmative Action Associate be invited to meet with the search committee at the first committee meeting.

Charging a Search Committee

Search committees should always formally receive their charge (instructions and required outcomes) from the hiring manager BEFORE they begin their work. These would include without any ambiguity, the committee’s task, timeline to conduct the search, the budget, skills, knowledge and abilities of the applicants the hiring manager wants to attract to the applicant pool.

Committee Charge Checklist

Typically, a search charge covers the following essential items, but this list is not exhaustive – there may be other items for the hiring manager to discuss with the search committee. At a minimum, the hiring manager should charge the committee with:

  • Knowing and understanding their assigned roles as outlined above.
  • Knowing and understanding the implications of any placement goals in the job group revealed by the Affirmative Action Plan.
  • Understanding and demonstrating the letter and spirit of affirmative action practices and regulations.
  • Understanding regulations governing record-keeping associated with the search process.
  • Knowing and understanding the importance of the vacant position. Reviewing the DRAFT and assisting with the final completion of the position description.
  • Using appropriate, job-related criteria (based on the qualifications for the position) in the screening process.
  • Knowing and understanding the search timeline. By what date does the hiring manager expect to have someone appointed and working in the position. The hiring manager should lay out a timeline, taking into consideration all of the tasks outlined above that need to be completed throughout the process.
  • Understanding the scope of the search – will it be a local, national, or international search?
  • Creating a search plan that encompasses advertising sources and the committee’s commitment to outreach and networking to spread the word to a wide, diverse, qualified pool of applicants. Search committee members are encouraged to invite qualified applicants to apply for the vacant position.
  • Understanding and demonstrating fair and equitable practices in screening applicants, conducting interviews, and conducting reference checks.
  • Understanding what steps, if any, the hiring manager desires to participate in or be consulted about.
  • Understanding how the committee’s final recommendations are to be brought forward to the hiring manager.   This task varies. Typically, the search committee is asked to provide an unranked list of acceptable finalists with an in-depth assessment of strengths and areas for development. Occasionally, the search committee is instructed to rank candidates for the hiring manager, or even to make a hiring recommendation. The charge should be made very clear that the hiring manager is not bound by the committee’s ranking or recommendations in making his or her selection. It should also be made clear that the hiring manager can reject any recommendations made by the committee if not satisfied with the final candidates. The committee may be instructed to start over if the applicant pool is not acceptable for any reason.
  • Understand which party will conduct reference and credential checks on the finalists. It may be that the search committee members will be requested to conduct these checks before making recommendations to the hiring manager. Or, it may be that the hiring manager wants to conduct these checks. The hiring manager must make sure this assignment is clear to all parties!
  • Understanding the role of a search firm or consultants if they are to be brought into the recruitment process.
  • Maintaining strict confidentiality throughout the search. Names, qualifications, personal demographic information, and how applicants are progressing through the search process should only be discussed among committee members and the hiring manager.
  • Submit all search records, including interview evaluations and other screening materials to the hiring manager when the search process is complete and an appointment accepted.

Search Administrator (Support)

1.   Manages applicant files by:

  1. Communicating with applicants and responding to requests for information.
  2. Ensuring strict confidentiality about applicants: their status in the search and their personal demographic information.

2.   Compiles applicant demographic information and provides reports to the search chair at each stage of the screening process.

3.   Performs other administrative support tasks that may include, but are not limited to placing approved ads and announcements, managing the status of applicants in the online system (including requesting interviews for qualified applicants), scheduling meetings and interviews, and making travel/lodging arrangements.

4.   Maintains strict confidentiality throughout the search process (includes, but not limited to applicants names, qualifications, personal demographic information, and committee discussions regarding applicants).

5.   If instructed by the hiring manager, enters the appropriate position description “action” into the Online PD and Recruiting System at website: http://jobs.oregonstate.edu/hr.

Hiring Manager

1.   Completes a position analysis for a vacant position to determine the essential functions of the position. Selects search committee members with subject matter expertise or experience, diverse perspectives, integrity, independent views, good judgment, strong group skills, open-mindedness, and commitment to the university’s standard of promoting and enhancing diversity. Appoints an Affirmative Action Search Advocate (AASA), as required/needed.

2.   Meets with the full search committee and formally “charges” them with the responsibility to participate in the development of the position (including development of the position description). Identifies the search “timeline” for the committee’s work, and with the committee, collaboratively develops a “search plan” that includes personal outreach to produce a diverse pool of qualified applicants. The hiring official is responsible for describing the vision, priorities, focus, and considerations to be adopted throughout the search process, and for introducing the AASA to the committee.

3.   Reviews screening results, as needed - especially if there is concern about some aspects of the screening process or lack of diversity in the finalist pool.

4.   Interviews applicants at the end of the campus visit (after the search committee, department representatives, stakeholders in the position, etc.) and answers any questions, and describe the next steps in the search process.

5.   Selects the appointee based on the available information (including application, interview results, reference checks, and the search committee’s written discussion of each applicant’s strengths and weaknesses), or makes a decision to reopen the search.

6.   Unclassified Appointments Only: Negotiates a verbal offer with the proposed appointee, including terms of employment such as salary, start date, start-up package (applies to some academic faculty positions), moving expenses, etc. Secures approval of offer from the Business Center Human Resources Office prior to finalizing the offer and presents the offer to the appointee.

 Hiring managers MUST obtain permission from their Business Center Human Resources Office prior to making any offer of employment for a classified position (including verbal offers).

7.   Announces the appointment, and creates a comprehensive plan to orient the new employee to the university, college, and department/unit.

8.   Maintains strict confidentiality throughout the search process (includes, but not limited to applicants names, qualifications, personal demographic information, and committee discussions regarding applicants).

9.    Gather ALL record related to a search, including committee notes, applicant evaluations, etc.  Retain according to regulations governing record-keeping associated with a search

Search Committee Chair

1. Establishes favorable search practices that will:

  1. Involve the search committee members in active recruitment and personal outreach to a diverse group of potential applicants.
  2. Encourage search committee members to recognize and avoid unintentional bias.
  3. Provide each applicant with full consideration in order to maintain equal opportunity and fairness throughout the process.
  4. Conform to regulations governing record-keeping associated with a search.

2. Directs the affirmative action efforts of the search by:

  1. Working collaboratively with the Affirmative Action Search Advocate if appointed to the search.
  2. Monitoring the demographics of the pool by requesting demographic summary information from the search administrator at each stage of the screening process.
  3. Identifying any groups screened out of the search process at a disproportionate rate, reviewing their applications, and determining when to have the search committee revisit a particular screening stage to evaluate application of criteria that produce such impacts.
  4. Acting affirmatively to advance women, people of color, and qualified veteran applicants at each stage of the screening process, especially to the interview stage, unless there is no reasonable chance for their success.
  5. Increasing good faith affirmative action efforts at every stage of the process when underrepresentation of women and people of color is present. These efforts include, but are not limited to: early review of qualifications and screening criteria, targeted recruiting; personal outreach; inclusive screening; and monitoring outcomes to assess and modify the current course of action, as necessary.

3.   Manages timely communication with applicants, search administrator, the hiring manager, stakeholders, and their Business Center Human Resources Office.

4.   Maintains strict confidentiality throughout the search process (includes, but not limited to applicants names, qualifications, personal demographic information, and committee discussions regarding applicants).

5.   Contacts applicants interviewed, but not selected, to inform them of their status.

6.   Serves as liaison between the search committee and the hiring manager.  Consults with their Business Center Human Resources Office and the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access, as appropriate.

7.   Calls and chairs committee meetings. Ensures the committee “charge” is carried out.

8.    Collects all documents related to the search, including screening of applications and interviews and forwards them to the hiring manager where they will be maintained for three years from the date of the initial appointment.

Search Committee Member

1.   Makes a commitment to participate in all aspects of the search process by:

  1. Evaluating the position and assisting with the development of the position description (highly recommended).
  2. Participating in active personal outreach to a diverse group of potential applicants.
  3. Recognizing and avoiding unintentional bias throughout the screening process. Provide each applicant full consideration in order to maintain equal opportunity and fairness throughout the search process. Act affirmatively to advance women, people of color, and qualified veteran applicants at each stage of the screening process, especially to the interview stage, unless there is no reasonable chance for their success.
  4. Increasing affirmative inclusionary efforts at every stage of the process when women or people of color are underrepresented in the job group.
  5. Providing a fair and equitable assessment of each applicant’s skills, knowledge and abilities to perform the functions of the job.
  6. Considering whether or not each applicant has “transferable” skills; those that might be used to meet minimum qualifications, in an effort to avoid unnecessary exclusion from further consideration.
  7. Reconsidering applicants who have been screened out of the process, as requested by the search committee chair.
  8. Providing an in-depth evaluation of each finalist’s strengths and weaknesses as part of the recommendation to the hiring manager.
  9. Understand and participate in the agreed upon recruitment activities, strategies, and timelines.
  10. Conform to regulations governing record-keeping associated with a search.

2. Maintains strict confidentiality throughout the search process (includes, but not limited to applicants names, qualifications, personal demographic information, and committee discussions regarding applicants).

Use of Applicant Demographic Information

Applicant demographic information (race/ethnicity, gender, and qualified veteran status is collected in an effort to build and support our affirmative action plan. In order to use this information appropriately, OSU is committed to:

1.   Keeping individual applicant demographic information confidential and separate from applicant files.

2.   Sharing demographic information only with the search committee chair as necessary, to evaluate success of recruitment efforts, and to assess potential exclusionary effect at each stage of the screening process.

Position Description Analysis & Development

Completing a Position Analysis

Before an accurate position description can be created for a position, a position analysis must be conducted in order to evaluate the need and purpose of the position, and the way the work should be performed. A position description should include a list of essential functions. The position analysis ensures that the work to be performed in a position is accurately described. A position description simply documents the findings of the position analysis.

Questions that Drive a Position Analysis

The intent of asking the following questions is to determine whether or not the tasks can be achieved in a new or different way:

  • What is the purpose of the position? By answering these questions, the essential functions of the position can be identified. A position exists to perform an essential function and the person hired to fill the position is hired for his/her ability to perform it.
  • What would happen if this position were not filled? Is it possible to transfer essential functions of the position to other positions within your department or other departments/units within the university?
  • What larger developments within the university or within the position’s specialized area play a role in determining different ways of thinking about the position? A good example here is offered by examining the fast-moving developments in information technology and sciences that have changed the qualifications you would look for when filling a Librarian position.
  • What can we learn from our past five years experience with this position? Has it been marked by high turnover or has it been a continuous trouble area? What accounts for the present vacancy?
  • What does any of this information tell us about the position? Does the position need to be redefined or perhaps eliminated?

The responsibility for analyzing a vacant (or new) position, rests primarily with the hiring manager, but it is recommended that at least one person higher in the line of authority become involved, if for no other reason than to guard against a token or narrowly focused review of the position and its essential functions. It is also recommended that unclassified position descriptions be shared with the search committee in draft form for feedback, questions, and proposed revisions/clarifications before it is finalized and approved by the hiring manager (the person ultimately responsible for its content).

Writing a Position Description

Importance of Position Descriptions

The position description is the primary document of personnel administration for the University. It affects how a position is classified and compensated. It serves as the foundation for setting expectations with an employee, and for performance evaluation and management. It also is important in determining the professional development needs of the incumbent. The development of a position description should be done thoughtfully and carefully. Do not let the pressing needs of a search process minimize the importance of developing an accurate position description.

Goal of Position Description Writing

Each position description should be written in such a way that it provides all the information an evaluation committee needs to clearly understand the duties the incumbent performs. It must accurately reflect all the duties and responsibilities required of the incumbent as well as the qualifications that person needs to satisfactorily fill the position.

Review the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access Principles for Developing the Position Description document for ideas around how to incorporate the diversity aspects of the position.

Position Summary

After the job analysis has been conducted, the next step is to begin writing the position description. From the job analysis, you should have an understanding of what the primary purpose of the position is. This is the position summary. Write the summary to explain what you need accomplished by this employee and how it relates to the mission of the organization. This should be no shorter than a sentence or two and no longer than a paragraph. In the position summary, balance the need to focus on the position’s purpose with the need to provide some limited information about the organization for recruiting purposes. Be sparing with your use of marketing language here, as the posting is the place best utilized to market the organization, location, etc.

Position Duties

This section should expand on the position summary. Write position duties so that they are clearly understandable by anyone who should happen to read the position description. The duties should be succinct. From your position analysis, begin grouping the position duties by similarity and importance. Typically, you will have no more than eight to ten groupings of position duties. Each group should have a common heading.

Tips: Do not list unnecessary details, only the important facts regarding the position. Avoid ambiguous terms and begin each statement with an action verb. Avoid jargon that the search committee and applicants may not understand. Avoid stating a list of performance expectations. Expectations may be listed in a separate document. Be accurate in describing the duties. Don’t overstate or understate - to do so may result in classifying the position incorrectly, affecting the compensation of the position. The duties must total 100%.

Decision Making/Guidelines

This section, along with the position summary, defines the scope and responsibility of the position. List what decisions the incumbent will be expected to make independently and which decisions they will make under the guidance of their supervisor. List the impact these decisions will have on the organization. What are the negative impacts of an incorrect decision?Then list what guidelines the incumbent will use in making these decisions.

Determining the Qualifications

Ensuring that the qualifications are accurate and necessary for the position is crucial to a successful search. Qualifications should not be so extensive that they limit the applicant pool or could be seen as discriminatory. Go back to the job analysis and the position description. What must the incumbent have upon beginning this position to be successful Create a list of these items. These will become your minimum qualifications, or the additional required qualifications. What qualifications would be helpful for the incumbent to have, or useful to the organization? These will become your preferred qualifications.

For Classified positions, the minimum qualifications come from the classification specifications and have been negotiated with SEIU. The additional required qualifications cannot exceed the minimum qualifications. Be careful when you list experience or education as a requirement and refer back to the minimum qualifications.

Refer to the Online PD and Recruiting System Position Titles for minimum qualifications for unclassified positions. If you require a degree, make sure to list what field the degree is in. (e.g. B.S. or B.A. in Psychology, or closely related field)

Sample Position Descriptions

Selected position summaries, decision-making statements, and descriptions of duties are available for the position titles referenced below. Click on the desired link to open a sample position description.

Academic Teaching/Research Faculty Position Titles:

Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Faculty Research Assistant
Instructor
Professor
Research Associate
Senior Faculty Research Assistant
Senior Instructor

Administrative/Professional Faculty Position Titles:

Advisor (Academic Advisor)
Assistant Dean
Associate Dean
Dean
Department Head
Department Chair
Director (Director Position Title)
Professional Faculty

Classified Staff Position Titles: see the Oregon Public Universities Classification Specifications for guidance 

 

Position Advertisement Guidelines Tenure-Track Teaching Positions

Why is this useful?  These guidelines make the path to permanent residence simpler for some teaching faculty who need long-term work authorization in the United States.

Where do these criteria come from?  The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) requires specific advertisement language in order for OSU to be eligible to file a Special Handling Labor Certification (SHLC) request, which is the first step in a three-part process culminating in permanent residence (aka a green card) for faculty who have classroom teaching duties.

What happens if our advertisement does not meet DOL criteria? We pursue other paths to permanent residence, some of which are more laborious for the faculty member. 

Who do I contact with questions?  Email OIS.scholar@oregonstate.edu

Example Ad
The Department of ______ at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon invites applications for a full-time (nine-month) tenure track Assistant, Associate, or Full professor starting on September 16, 2018.  Duties include teaching undergraduate and graduate classes, developing an externally-funded research program, and providing service to the Department, College, and University.  Requirements include a PhD by the start of employment in X, Y, Z, or a closely related discipline and the ability to contribute to teaching excellence. Preference will be given to candidates with a demonstrable commitment to promoting and enhancing diversity.  To apply, submit letter of interest and curriculum vitae to https://jobs.oregonstate.edu/, posting #P000000 by December 15, 2017.

 DOL Criteria Checklist

 Advertise in a National Journal with either a web-based or a print ad

  • Web ad: advertise in an online professional journal with a national circulation for a minimum of 30 days, collect documentation that shows the ad ran for 30 days
  • Print Ad: place an advertisement in the print version of a professional journal with a national circulation, keep a copy of the ad as it appeared in the journal

 Position Title: rank must be stated.  E.g.:  Appointment is anticipated at the Assistant Professor level, but candidates with exceptional qualifications may be considered for appointment as Associate Professor or Professor

 Duties: briefly outlined and include the word “teaching”

 FTE: Note that the position is full-time

 Minimum & Preferred Qualifications: ideally, the minimum qualifications will be objectively measurable.  Preferred qualifications are best when prefaced with “demonstrated ability to…” or “knowledge of…” rather than “experience in…”

 Degree: explicitly list all disciplines acceptable for position. E.g.:  PhD required in X, Y, Z, or a closely related disciplineIf applicants will be considered who have not yet completed their PhDs, be sure to include PhD required by start of employment in X, Y, Z, or a closely related discipline

 To Apply: describe the application process, e.g.: Submit letter of interest and vitae to OSU jobs website (https://jobs.oregonstate.edu/), posting #P12123UF

 Location: indicate the name of the city where the work will be performed

 

Recruiting

The Search - Recruiting an Applicant Pool

An eventual appointment cannot be better than the talent recruited to the applicant pool. The search committee’s objective is to build a top-notch applicant pool from which an appointment can be made. Competitive postings are automatically placed on the OSU Jobs Site at http://oregonstate.edu/jobs.  In addition to the OSU jobs site, the committee must develop a search plan that typically will include all of the following approaches:

  • Looking inside the University for capable applicants. Call and invite potential internal employees to apply for the position.
  • Advertising in newspapers, business/trade/professional journals, online agencies (Monster.com, etc.), newsletters, magazines, and affirmative action publications or jobs sites.
  • The Office of Equal Opportunity and Access maintains a current list of Advertising and Recruiting Resources to assist search committees in their recruitment efforts. The new interactive Recruitment Resources Guide replaces the Diversity Mailing lists (D, F, G) that were used through Printing & Mailing Services.  One of the results that the guide returns is a customized “Required Email Distribution Listserv,” which will make it easier for you to distribute job announcements.
  • Review EOA's Principles for Developing the Position Description document for ideas around how to effectively market your position and strategies for reaching a broad and diverse applicant pool.
  • Focusing on a person-to-person networking to actively reach top-notch applicants who may not respond to the broadcast advertising. Some may be happily and productively employed elsewhere – and not reading the newspapers, journals, publications, or searching online for a new position elsewhere. Some may be highly talented and capable professionals who, for a variety of reasons, have not considered OSU or Oregon in their career futures. Personal contact from someone within the institution can often persuade them to give us a chance. Members of the search committee must know what they are looking for and where to work the phones to find and present opportunities to potentially outstanding applicants. Networking has been, and still is, the number one recruitment method!

 Writing Position Advertisements

Sample Advertisements for Classified Positions

Inventory Control Specialist, (Department Name) at Oregon State University. F/T, starting at $XXXX/monthly + benefits. Major duties include maintaining inventory listings, asset locations and loan agreements; conducting biennial inventory scans; ensuring safe warehousing practices; disposing of obsolete or inoperable equipment; and submitting claims to Risk Management for lost, stolen, or damaged equipment. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs. Apply to posting # ______. Closing Date: --/--/--. OSU is an AA/EOE/Vets/Disabled.

Cost-Saver

(Classification/Title), (Department Name) at OSU. F/T, $(salary)/monthly + benefits. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs. Apply to posting #_____. Closing Date: --/--/--. OSU is an AA/EOE/Vets/Disabled.

Sample Advertisements for Unclassified Positions

(Position Title), (Department), Oregon State University.  Responsibilities include ***. Position is a full/part time, 12/9-month tenure-track position.  Salary is commensurate with education and experience. Required qualifications include ***. Preferred qualifications include ***, and a demonstrable commitment to promoting and enhancing diversity. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs. Apply to posting # ______. Closing Date: --/--/--. OSU is an AA/EOE/Vets/Disabled.

Oregon State University, Department of ________, is recruiting for full/part-time Instructors to teach on a term by term basis for the 20XX-20XX academic year. These are fixed-term appointments. Some of these appointments may be reviewed for renewal or transition to an instructional position on an annual basis at the discretion of the Department Head/Chair/Dean.  Courses to be taught may include _____. Salary is commensurate with education and experience. Required qualifications: MS, MA, or Ph.D. in ____; evident commitment to cultural diversity & educational equity; teaching experience at the college or university level (in some cases this qualification may be preferred rather than required and is based on department need). Preferred qualifications include _____ and a demonstrable commitment to promoting and enhancing diversity. For consideration to teach Fall Term 20XX, applications should be received by MM/DD/YYYY. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs . Apply to posting #____. You will be required to electronically submit a letter of application describing your experience, qualification and interest (if recruiting for multiple disciplines, ask applicants to identify which discipline(s) they are qualified to teach), curriculum vita, evidence of teaching excellence (if this is a required qualification) and names/phone #’s of three professional references. Contact (name) at (email or phone number) with questions. OSU is an AA/EOE/Vets/Disabled.

(Position Title), (Department), Oregon State University. Responsibilities include ***. Position is a full/part time, 12-month fixed-term professional faculty position. Salary is commensurate with education and experience. Required qualifications include ***. Preferred qualifications include ***, and a demonstrable commitment to promoting and enhancing diversity. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs. Apply to posting # ______. Closing Date: --/--/--. OSU is an AA/EOE/Vets/Disabled.

Cost-Saver

(Position Title) (Department), OSU. Required qualifications include ______. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs. Apply to posting #_____.  OSU is an AA/EOE/Vets/Disabled.

 

Job Announcement Taglines

In OSU’s online application system, the following tagline will be included automatically at the end of each job listing (in the Special Instructions to Applicants field), unless you specifically request one of the other options:

OSU commits to inclusive excellence by advancing equity and diversity in all that we do. We are an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer, and particularly encourage applications from members of historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, women, individuals with disabilities, veterans, LGBTQ community members, and others who demonstrate the ability to help us achieve our vision of a diverse and inclusive community. 

 For other electronic listings (such as listserv announcements, job seeker websites, etc.) when per/word cost is not a factor, you may use the tagline above or either of the following options:

OSU seeks diversity as a source of enrichment for our university community. We are an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer, and particularly encourage applications from members of historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, women, individuals with disabilities, veterans, LGBTQ community members, and others who demonstrate the ability to help us achieve our vision of a diverse and inclusive community.

OSU is committed to a culture of civility, respect, and inclusivity.  As an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer, OSU values diversity in our faculty and staff regardless of their self-identity; to that end, we particularly encourage applications from members of historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, veterans, women, LGBTQ community members, and others who demonstrate the ability to help us achieve our vision of a diverse and inclusive community. 

 For paid employment ads in publications which charge by the word, if the above taglines are cost-prohibitive, the following abbreviated tagline may be used:

OSU is an AA/EOE/Vets/Disabled

Conducting an Accelerated Search

An accelerated search may be warranted with (1) there is an immediate need to fill a position, or (2) a position has a narrow constituency or focus of accountability, or (3) recruiting candidates for a position requires strict confidentiality. In such cases, your business center Human Resources Manager may authorize an accelerated search. An accelerated search may differ from a regular search by shortening the time frame for inviting applications (13 calendar days or less - minimum 5 business days), and (1) limiting the distribution of the announcement, and/or (2) narrowing the participation of the search committee, and/or (3) focusing on identifying one finalist to be interviewed.

Questions or Concerns?

If you have questions or concerns at any stage in the search and selection process, please contact your Business Center HR Management Team for guidance.

Screening Applicants

At the screening stage, the role of the search committee is to evaluate applicant’s qualifications and to subject them to intense scrutiny to determine which applicants are the most qualified for the position.

Once applicants begin to apply for a position, the search committee members can begin reviewing the applicant pool to determine if the recruitment resulted in a sufficient number of qualified applicants for consideration, and if the pool is sufficiently diverse. If not, the search committee should confer with the hiring manager to determine the next steps in extending the search process and engaging in more additional focused recruiting.

If the search committee determines that the applicant pool is acceptable, they proceed with the screening process. The screening process begins with the analysis of materials sent in response to the job posting. This analysis is undertaken to ensure that applicants have all of the qualifications specified in the job posting.

Special note: Applicants have the option to upload application materials to the OSU Online Recruiting System or paste information into a text field; the system only accepts PDF (.pdf), Rich Text (.rtf), Microsoft Word (.doc and .docx) and Text (.txt) documents. PDFs are the system’s preference. If a document is not a PDF at the upload stage, the system converts them to PDF.

The result of pasting information into the text field or the system conversion from one format to a PDF may result in special characters like bullets or hyphens being converted to question marks, and other formatting issues. Please see the examples below.

It is important to remember that applicant qualifications, rather than document format, should be the focus of the application review. If document format raises questions about computer expertise or attention to detail, it is appropriate to explore those questions during the interview or reference check process.

Important Reminder:  Application materials may include protected or sensitive information such as Social Security Numbers, Driver's License Numbers or the applicant's Date of Birth.  We have asked that applicants redact this information before submitting a document, but in the event that protected or sensitive information is visible, it is CRITICAL that this information is not shared outside of the search committee or considered in evaluating candidates and IF PRINTED, this protected information be redacted before reviewing as a committee.

Initial Screening

To increase the fairness of the screening process, each committee member should screen each application. If the pool is too large, the chair can consider dividing the search committee into sub-groups (of 2-3), giving a portion of the applications to each sub-group to evaluate for the initial screening.

Grouping of applicants is useful at every stage of the screening process. Ranking of applicants is not advised, and particularly not during the initial stages of screening. During this initial screening, each committee member should simply indicate whether each applicant is minimally qualified, and therefore should receive further consideration.

A screening checklist can help the search committee quickly verify each applicant’s possession of required and preferred qualifications:

SCREENING CHECKLIST - Example #1

Applicant’s Name:
Rated by:
Date:

Required Qualifications:YesNoB.A. in Business Admin or related field (list degree):________Five years experience in career development and employee relations________Individual counseling experience________Group counseling experience________   Preferred Qualifications: Yes NoMaster’s Degree in Business Admin or related field (list degree):________Professional license________

Comments:



 

 

Important: OAR 580-20-005 prohibits one from simultaneously holding the status of faculty member (all unclassified positions; those with rank) and graduate student. Thus, students are considered to be in active student status from the time of matriculation until degree certification and, thus, are ineligible for faculty positions unless the Dean of the Graduate School has granted an exception to the OAR. Criteria by which exceptions may be considered are found at http://gradschool.oregonstate.edu/admissions/faculty-as-student.  Please note that this OAR applies for each term, including summer term. Please contact the Graduate School if you have any questions about this OAR. An applicant should not be screened out of the process simply because they are a graduate student and will require an exception to the OAR.

 

SCREENING CHECKLIST – Example #2

Rated by:
Date:

Applicant’s Names

BA in Bus Admin or related field

Five years experience in career development and employee relations

Individual counseling experience

Group counseling experience

Master’s degree in Bus Admin or related field

Professional license

 

Smith, Ally

 

 

BA in Bus Admin

 

7 years

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

No

 

No

 

Finger, Carol

 

BA in Marketing

 

4 years

 

Yes

 

No

 

Yes

 

Yes

Comments:

 

 

 

 

Important: OAR 580-20-005 prohibits one from simultaneously holding the status of faculty member (all unclassified positions; those with rank) and graduate student. Thus, students are considered to be in active student status from the time of matriculation until degree certification and, thus, are ineligible for faculty positions unless the Dean of the Graduate School has granted an exception to the OAR. Criteria by which exceptions may be considered are found at http://gradschool.oregonstate.edu/admissions/faculty-as-student.  Please note that this OAR applies for each term, including summer term. Please contact the Graduate School if you have any questions about this OAR. An applicant should not be screened out of the process simply because they are a graduate student and will require an exception to the OAR.

Search committee members are encouraged to separate applicants into categories, such as unqualified or unacceptable applicants, qualified applicants, and highly qualified applicants.

At each stage of screening, the search chair considers whether members of these groups are being screened out at a rate that is disproportionate to their representation in the pool currently under consideration. After the initial review of the qualifications of each applicant and the determination by the search committee of the qualified applicant pool, the chair reviews the resulting applicant pool with the search committee to evaluate how women, people of color, and veteran applicants have fared in the screening for the qualified pool. If appropriate, the search chair may ask the committee to re-evaluate the screening process for unintentional bias or overly narrow interpretation of the criteria.

The search committee then selects the applicants they would like to consider further for an interview. The chair again reviews this list of applicants with the search committee to evaluate how women, people of color, and veteran applicants have fared in the screening. After revisiting criteria that may need refinement and/or applicants that may merit additional consideration, the chair must provide the search administrator with job-related screening reasons for each applicant the committee has decided not to invite for an interview.

Consideration of Qualified Veteran Applicants in the Screening Process

The university has clarified its policy on affirmative consideration of veterans in the hiring process.  This memorandum supersedes all prior memoranda in which we advised the university community of the Veterans Preference Procedure in Public Employment. 

The procedure described below provides an affirmative preference to individuals who self-identify as qualifying veterans.  In this case, qualifying veterans means all veterans or disabled veterans who served on active duty with the Armed Forces of the United States and were honorably discharged.   This procedure is effective immediately.

Determining eligibility of the applicant:  Any veteran or disabled veteran honorably discharged from U.S. military service may be eligible for special consideration in the screening and selection process if he or she meets the minimum qualifications and for the position.   OSU will consider evidence of transferrable skills presented by veterans when considering whether the minimum qualifications for the position have been met.  A qualifying veteran applicant’s statement that s/he was honorably discharged from U.S. military service is sufficient during the early stages of selection, but may be verified by the hiring unit if s/he advances to on-site interview.  During the site visit, the applicant may be asked to show a copy of a Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty (DD form 214 or 215) or a letter from the US Department of Veteran’s Affairs indicating receipt of a non-service connected pension.  Information contained in these documents will be kept confidential except as required under federal regulation CFR 41§ 60-300.

Special consideration for eligible applicants:  Hiring units will give special consideration to qualifying veterans when the qualifying veteran applicant meets the minimum qualifications for the position for which she or he has applied. OSU will consider evidence of transferrable skills presented by veterans when considering whether the minimum qualifications for the position have been met. 

For questions about how to give special consideration, the hiring unit may consult with a representative from their Business Center HR office or from the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access.

Checking References and Verifying Credentials – Optional at This Stage of the Process

If the search committee decides to check professional references for the top tier group of applicants at this stage of the screening process, hiring officials are encouraged to talk with former supervisors and professional associates in order to obtain specific information about the applicant’s experience and qualifications in previous positions. Degrees, professional licenses and credentials should be checked before an offer of employment is extended to an applicant. Completing these checks at this stage of the review process is also optional. Search committee members can use the National Clearinghouse at http://www.degreeverify.com to verify degrees.

IMPORTANT: Contact candidates before contacting professional references: Before contacting any references, contact the candidates to let them know (1) where you are in the screening process and (2) that you are about to begin contacting their references.  Some candidates may not yet have informed their employers that they have applied for another position.  Be responsive if a candidate objects to having their references contacted, and try to address any concerns they may have.

An Important Word Regarding Screening Reasons (Reasons for Non-Selection)

Screening reasons provided must be accurate and specific to EACH applicant. The Office of Federal Contractor Compliance Programs audits OSU’s recruitments and selections, and they conduct an in-depth review of the screening reasons provided for each applicant screened out of the recruitment process at EACH STEP OF THE PROCESS. Search committee chairs will be required to provide detailed documentation for each applicant screened out of any step of the process; therefore it is critical that detailed, accurate screening reasons for all applicants be maintained with the search records. Hand-written notes created by search committee members are auditable, and should be maintained by the department – in the recruitment file - for a period of three years from the date an appointment is made.

Interviewing

Preparing for Interviews

There are some major factors that must be taken into consideration when scheduling interviews. First, the search committee and chair must determine how many people (aside from the main committee) will meet with each applicant one-on-one, in an open-forum, or during professional presentations. These people include prospective peers, subordinates, department heads/chairs, etc. Various customers or constituents might also be included in interviews.

Another factor that must be taken into account is the potential need for the search committee to arrange or provide meals and other social events as well as transportation and lodging. The committee chair is usually the chief host, but will often seek volunteers for or assign committee members to assisting with hosting applicants.

As a host, a committee member may be responsible for picking up an applicant from the airport, taking him/her on a campus tour, having dinner, and answering questions about the position in question and the selection process. The committee chair may also ask the hiring department to assist with the many administrative and logistical requirements of arranging and holding on-site interviews.

When applicants will be meeting with more than the search committee during their visit to campus, the search committee should send applicants a schedule of events in advance. The schedule should note the names and titles of the individuals with whom the applicants will meet. Copies of the schedule should be given to these individuals. The individuals responsible for escorting applicants to and from meetings should also be identified. This information can accompany a welcome package that should be sent to all interviewees:

Welcome Packages for Interviewees

This is a brief list of information that the committee should consider sending to each applicant invited for an interview on campus (or by phone):

  • Employee/faculty handbook (or online link)
  • Benefits summary
  • University catalog
  • Department brochure or other literature that identifies the mission and goals of the hiring department
  • Organizational charts (both department and institution)
  • Information about the university – it’s mission and history
  • Promotional materials, i.e., a copy of OSU’s monthly research magazine
  • Information from the local Chamber of Commerce
Interview Preparation Checklist
  • Send welcome package to interviewees
  • Confirm travel and lodging arrangements
  • Arrange transportation from airport or other location
  • Arrange for tour of campus or community, as appropriate
  • Arrange meeting with the hiring manager
  • Arrange meetings with appropriate committees, groups, individuals
  • Schedule presentations or open forums
  • Schedule meals and breaks
  • Schedule rooms for meetings and presentations

In addition, the search committee members should review the position description, draft and agree upon the interview questions to be asked, and agree on the format for conducting the interviews.

 

Developing Appropriate Interview Questions

Good interview questions will illuminate the experience of an applicant well enough to indicate the prospects for his/her success in the position. Generally, all questions should be related to the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to successfully carry out the duties and responsibilities of a position. Questions about basic workplace competencies, work ethic, decision making, problem solving, and interpersonal skills that indicate a person’s professional character are also appropriate.

The criteria for determining which questions are acceptable are:

  • Ask only for information that is needed to make a hiring decision;
  • Know how the committee will use the information to make a hiring decision; and
  • Recognize that seeking information that is not job-related can be difficult to defend.

The BEST interview questions will emerge from a careful analysis of the position description.

Types of Interview Questions

Interview questions can be informational, situational, or behavioral. Informational questions ascertain the facts of an applicant’s education and work experience. Situation questions ascertain an applicant’s response to a hypothetical or real-life situation, and also test an applicant’s ability to analyze and solve problems, or make decisions. Behavioral questions ascertain the nature of the applicant’s past behavior, which is an excellent indicator of future performance. While each of the three types of questions are appropriate, the preferred and encouraged method of interviewing is behavioral interviewing because it helps predict how an applicant will “behave” in the position.

Behavioral Interviewing

Behavioral interviewing is a technique that focuses on specific job-related experiences. The questions are designed to address the knowledge, skills, and abilities for the position, and to provide detailed information about performance skills that may not be available in the written application materials. Behavioral interviewing questions focus on specific examples of an applicant’s past behavior in an effort to predict future behavior. Examples of such questions are “How would you organize your work if you had more tasks than time to do them?” and “How did you accomplish the project you described in your resume?”  Behavioral interview is a technique that frames questions in a way that a simple “yes” or “no” answer cannot be given.

Sample Interview Questions

Teaching/Research/Public Service:

  • How do you create a unique, compelling learning environment for students in your classes?
  • Tell us about a specific research (or teaching) project that included the involvement of your students.
  • Describe a situation that was related to your teaching or research that was particularly difficult for you. Describe the circumstances, how you managed the situation, and the outcome.
  • What technology applications have you utilized in the classroom?
  • How would you go about being an advocate and resource for the use of technology in the teaching and learning process?
  • How do you feel your teaching style can serve our student population?  Be specific.
  • Describe a time when you felt your workload as a faculty member was “split” into areas that you believed to be inappropriate. Describe the circumstances of this situation, and how you addressed and resolved your concerns with your department head.

Organizational/Teamwork/General Skills:

  • Give us an example of a time when you had to pull together constituents, both for and against your methods for completing an important project or task. What was your strategy to get everyone to work together?  What was the outcome?
  • Tell us about a time when you were required to perform what you felt were boring or mundane tasks. How did you keep yourself motivated while performing these tasks?
  • What types of decisions do you make in your current position without consulting your manager or department head?  
  • Give us an example of a time when you were able to communicate successfully with another person, even when that individual may not have personally liked you.
  • A respect for privacy and confidentiality is important to this position. Tell us about a time when someone asked you to share information regarding your employer or customer. What was the nature of the inquiry and how did you respond?
  • Tell us about your personal philosophy and approach to teamwork. Please be specific and describe what behaviors you display to support and encourage a collaborative work environment.
  • Describe your customer service experience. Give us an example of how you once solved a serious problem for one of your customers or constituents. What was the outcome?
  • Describe a situation in which you did “all the right things” related to your research or another important issue in your workplace, and were still unsuccessful in your outcome. What did you learn from the experience, and what would you have done differently?

Diversity:

Questions regarding diversity should not be used to obtain personal information about an applicant’s identity status, but rather to determine what skills they bring to an increasingly diverse workplace.

  • OSU strives to build an organizational culture that will allow each individual to enter, participate and thrive – unimpaired by barriers related to his/her identity status. Each of us is valued for our uniqueness. Describe how your background and experience has prepared you to be effective in an environment that values diversity.
  • Tell us about a time that you adapted your style in order to work effectively with those who were different from you.
  • What kinds of experiences have you had in relating with people whose backgrounds are different than your own?
  • Have you ever realized that you had said or done something that may have been offensive to a colleague?  How did you respond to that realization, and what was the outcome?
  • Describe a specific situation in which you worked with a diverse group of people over a period of time.  Based on this experience, what did you learn?
  • In what ways have you integrated multicultural issues as part of your professional development?

Visit the Office of the President’s website at http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/president/sample-interview-questions for a list of additional interview questions related to diversity.

 

Inappropriate Interview Questions

Interview questions must be job-related. Questions designed to elicit information that can later be used in a discriminatory manner when making a hiring decision should be avoided. The following subjects include factors that when used or considered during an interview, might be interpreted to violate non-discrimination laws. These subjects should be avoided.

Address

Specific inquiry into foreign addresses, which would indicate national origin.

Age

Age, date of birth or any other inquiries that would require applicants to disclose their age.

Ancestry

Applicant’s nationality, lineage, ancestry, national origin, descent or parentage; length of residency in the United States; ancestry of immediate family or spouse's family; and questions regarding how the applicant acquired the ability to read, write or speak a foreign language.

Birth Place

Birth-place of applicant, applicant’s parents, spouse, or other relatives, or any other inquiry into national origin.

Children or

Dependents

Any inquiries regarding the number, age, and child care arrangement for the applicant's children or other dependents, or intentions regarding becoming a parent in the future. Such questions could be regarded as discriminatory against single parents.

Citizenship or Work Authorization

Inquiries regarding country or citizenship other than the United States; inquiries to naturalized citizens regarding citizenship status of parents or spouse; or date of acquisition of U.S. citizenship.  Inquiries regarding work authorization may not be addressed until after acceptance of a written offer.

Convictions, Arrests and Court Records

Any inquiries regarding arrests; questions regarding conviction and court records that are not substantially related to the function and responsibilities of the position.

Disabilities

Inquiries regarding an applicant's disability. If an applicant volunteers this information during the course of the interview, it can be considered in relation to the applicant’s ability to perform the essential functions of the position. If an applicant has an obvious disability or voluntarily discloses a disability that causes the committee concern about whether that person could perform the essential functions of the job, the committee can ask the applicant to describe or demonstrate how, with or without reasonable accommodation the applicant will perform essential job functions. However, if this question is asked of one applicant, it must be asked of all applicants, not just those with obvious or disclosed disabilities.

Education

Any inquiry asking specifically the nationality, racial or religious affiliation of a school.

Financial Status, Credit Record, or Car Ownership

These questions are unrelated to the applicant’s ability to perform the requirements of the position and tend to discriminate against certain groups. Financial status inquiries regarding past ownership, bankruptcy or garnishment of wages.

Graduation dates

Any inquiries concerning the dates that an applicant graduated from high school or college, which might indicate an applicant’s age.

Health Issues

Any inquiries related to an applicant’s health, especially in regard to whether an applicant has AIDS or is HIV positive.

Marital Status

Any inquiry regarding whether the applicant is married, single, widowed, separated or engaged to be married may imply discrimination against women because of common societal assumptions that women often leave jobs when they get married or have children. In addition, societal assumptions regarding married and single, divorced, widowed or separated people may contribute to an atmosphere of perceived discrimination. Discrimination on the basis of marital status is illegal under Oregon Law and Board Rule.

Military Discharge

Any inquiry regarding the nature of a person’s discharge.

Military Service

Inquiries into the dates that an applicant either joined or left military service, whichcould be used to determine an applicant’s age. Questions should not be asked about the nature of the person’s military discharge or whether they ever served in another country’s armed services.

Name

Inquiries about name that would indicate an applicant’s lineage, ancestry, national origin, descent or marital status.

Opposite Sex

Any inquiries regarding how an applicant would feel about working or traveling with members of the opposite sex are potentially discriminatory because answers are not always considered equally from men and women.

Organization

Inquiries regarding organizations which would indicate by their character or name the race, religion, color or ancestry of the applicant.

Photographs

No photographs may be requested or required prior to selection.

Political Issues

Any questions regarding political party affiliation or opinions on political issues.

Pregnancy

Any inquiries regarding pregnancy or potential pregnancy of an applicant.

Race or Color

Any inquiries regarding an applicant’s race, the racial group with which the applicant may identify, or regarding other physical features which may be directly or indirectly indicative of race or color.

Relatives

Inquiry regarding spouse’s name, because it may indicate marital status. Names or addresses of any relatives certainly should not be requested.

Religion

An applicant’s religious denomination or affiliation, church, parish, pastor, or religious holidays observed should not be discussed during an interview. The relationship of a person’s religious beliefs to their professional employment is an improper area of inquiry until after the selection is completed. At that time, any potential need for accommodation to a person’s religious beliefs or practices may be discussed. Though applicants may not be told that employees are required to work on religious holidays, they may be asked if they are available to work on specific days (for example, Saturdays or Sundays), but it must be asked of every applicant and should not be phrased in the context of religious observances. However, an applicant’s religious beliefs must be accommodated unless such accommodation creates undue hardship to the university or department.

Union Membership

Any questions regarding current or past union membership or activities should be avoided.

Workers Compensation

Inquiries into an applicant’s workers compensation history are inappropriate. An employer may not discriminate against an applicant because that applicant has utilized the workers’ compensation system, nor may an employer base a hiring decision on the likelihood that an applicant may cause increased workers’ compensation costs in the future.

 

Conducting Interviews

Interviews serve several purposes, but primarily they are used to compare applicants and to determine which applicant’s skills, knowledge, and abilities best match the position’s duties. The committee has an opportunity to promote the position and employment with Oregon State University. The applicants also benefit by learning about the position and the university. Campus employees and community constituents also benefit by meeting applicants, interviewing or interacting with them, watching presentations, and providing feedback to the search committee.

During the Interview
  • Introduce the committee members
  • Describe the format of the interview
  • Let the applicant do most of the talking
  • Keep the interview on track
  • Take legible notes – they will become part of the permanent search record
  • Allow time for the applicant to ask questions
  • Describe the remainder of the search process and the anticipated appointment date
  • Thank applicant for his/her time

 

Evaluating Outcomes of Interviews/Tools

Once interviews are completed, the search committee reconvenes and evaluates the results of the applicant interviews. The evaluations for each applicant should include their name, qualifications, strengths, weaknesses, assessment of the diversity criterion, and an overall assessment of their interview.

SAMPLE INTERVIEW EVALUATION FORM

Applicant’s Name: ____________________________________________  Date:  ________________

 

Interviewer: _______________________________________________________________________

 

Applicant’s qualifications:

 

 

 

 

Applicant’s strengths:

 

 

 

 

Applicant’s weaknesses

 

 

 

 

 Does the applicant appear to be able to perform the job duties?  Why or why not: 

 

 

 

 

 

 Did the applicant answer all questions to your satisfactory?  If not, explain:

 

 

 

 

 

 Do you have reservations about this applicant’s ability to succeed in this position and/or at OSU?  Why or why not:

 

 

 

 

 

 How would you rank this applicant in relation to the other applicants who have been interviewed?

 

 

 

 

 Other comments:

 

 

 

Reference Checking & More

Conducting Reference Checks/Verifying Credentials

The hiring manager or a member of the search committee must check professional references and verify credentials (degrees, licenses, certifications, etc.) prior to seeking approval to appoint a selected applicant. Degrees can be verified at website: http://www.degreeverify.com

IMPORTANT: Contact candidates before contacting professional references: Before contacting any references, contact the candidates to let them know (1) where you are in the screening process and (2) that you are about to begin contacting their references.  Some candidates may not yet have informed their employers that they have applied for another position.  Be responsive if a candidate objects to having their references contacted, and try to address any concerns they may have.

Whose references to check, and when:

Finalists – Structured reference checks are usually conducted for any candidates still under consideration after the site visits/final interviews, at the same time credentials (degrees, licenses, certifications, etc.) are verified.  This is true even if preliminary structured reference checking was performed earlier in the process.  At a minimum, final references for the proposed appointee should be checked before an offer is made.

Semi-finalists – Preliminary structured reference checks are sometimes conducted earlier in the screening process (prior to site interview).  When needed, these reference checks usually occur after phone or skype interviews, because additional information is required to determine which candidates to advance to site interview. Candidates are more likely to be concerned about you contacting their current employers this early in the process; if this occurs, one option is to delay checking current employer references for all candidates until after the site interviews.

Whom to contact for reference checks: When conducting a reference check, officials are encouraged to talk with a former supervisor as well as former colleagues, peers, staff and other professional associates. A former supervisor can speak specifically to an applicant’s quality and quantity of work, reliability, potential problem areas, and specific job behaviors. It is recommended that hiring officials contact at least three past employers to find consistent trends in the applicant’s past performance. Calling several employers will also help balance the information received and guard against making a decision based on opinions or information that may not be factual. It is important that the solicited information relates directly to the applicant’s ability to carry out the responsibilities of the job.

Managing the Conversation with a Professional Reference
  1. Identify yourself and the applicant and ask the reference if it’s a good time to talk.
  2. Briefly describe the position.
  3. Assure the reference that the information they provide will be held as confidential as the law allows.
  4. Confirm the dates of employment and the reference's relationship with the applicant.
  5. Verify the job titles, both formal and informal.
  6. Inquire about job-related skills, experience and performance. Ask open- ended questions.
  7. Discuss attendance records, including unexcused absenteeism and tardiness. Specific information, such as the average number of days absent (excused or unexcused) or tardy per month, may be the most helpful.
  8. Inquire about reason for termination. Although a human resources office can provide an official reason, a supervisor generally can provide a more thorough explanation.
  9. Ask about the possibility of rehire. A former employer’s reluctance to rehire should be a cause for concern. However, some firms have general policies prohibiting rehires. If this is the case, it should be noted.
  10. Seek information about disciplinary actions. It is important to know if the applicant was ever reprimanded or disciplined, and the reasons for this action.
Sample Questions

What is/was your relationship to (applicant)?

From what month and year until what month and year did you work with (applicant)?

Can you verify the position(s) he or she held?

Did you have the opportunity to observe (applicant) in his/her position as ***?

How would you describe his/her performance in this position?

If hired to work at OSU, (applicant) will be expected to work well in a diverse environment. Can you tell me, based on your past personal observations, how s/he would meet this expectation?

Describe (applicant) ability to take on and learn new tasks.

In what areas does (applicant) need additional development/improvement?

Describe (applicant) organizational/time management skills.

How much supervision did (applicant) require?

How would you compare the performance of (applicant) with that of others who have held the same job?

Describe (applicant) communication skills with customers/co-workers/supervisors.

What type of business correspondence did (applicant) compose?  Describe the quality of his/her writing including grammar, spelling and punctuation.

Please describe (applicant) work ethic in the context of tardiness, absenteeism, attitude, abuse of sick or vacation time, dependability, trustworthiness, or completion of assigned tasks.

Why did (applicant) leave your organization?

Would you hesitate to re-employ or work with (applicant) if you had the opportunity?

Is there any additional information that you feel we should have in considering (applicant) for employment?

The information received from a reference is a critical part of the evaluation of each applicant. If the reference raises any doubts, additional references and follow-up interviews with the applicant should be scheduled.  Information collected by a reference should be kept as confidential as the law will allow. The information received from a reference must be filed with the recruitment file, separate from employee's files.

Conducting Criminal History Checks

Positions that are designated as critical or security-sensitive require the completion of a criminal history  check. This requirement must be included in the “Minimum/Required Qualifications” of the position description at the time a recruitment action is submitted through the Online Recruiting System. Department/Unit administrators are required to identify those positions in which the incumbent is required to perform critical or security-sensitive work. You will find criminal history check forms and policy documents as well as a security-sensitive access crosswalk at: http://hr.oregonstate.edu/manual/criminal-history-check to assist you in making that determination.  If a position requires a criminal history check,  only a candidate who has successfully completed the check may fill the position. This release may be found at http://hr.oregonstate.edu/manual/criminal-history-check or it is accessible from the Oregon State Central Administrative Resources (OSCAR) home page at website: http://oscar.oregonstate.edu. From the OSCAR home page, click on Downloadable Forms from the left menu. Please complete the top section of the first page with the posting information (hiring department, supervisor’s name, index number, etc.) before providing it to the final applicant(s). The release should be returned directly to the Office of Human Resources as instructed at the bottom of page one. The Office of Human Resources will report results to the supervisor listed in the posting and the appropriate business center once the results have been reviewed.

An appointee may NOT begin working in a new position until the background check process is completed with satisfactory results. No allowances are made regarding this requirement.

Motor Vehicle History Checks

Positions which require driving a University vehicle, or a personal vehicle, on behalf of the University, need a motor vehicle check. This requirement must be included in the “Additional Required Qualifications” of the position description at the time a recruitment action is submitted through the Online Recruiting System. Department/Unit administrators are required to identify those positions in which the incumbent is required to perform security-sensitive work.  

The incumbent is required to possess and maintain a valid driver's license in their state of residence. Final candidates may obtain their official/certified (Oregon license holders will request a Certified Court Print) driving history from the issuing state's DMV for the past 36 months and either submit an electronic copy to employment@oregonstate.edu, or fax a copy to 541.737.7771 Attn: Employment (most DMV offices will fax directly if requested) or submit a hard copy to:

Office of Human Resources
122 Kerr Administration Building
Corvallis, OR  97331
Attn: Employment

An appointee may NOT begin working in a new position until the motor vehicle history check process is completed with satisfactory results. No allowances are made regarding this requirement.

This policy does not apply to incumbents who only use motor pool vehicles.

Making an Offer

Making Recommendations to the Hiring Manager

Once interviews are completed, the search committee chair should meet with the hiring manager to make recommendations for hire. The chair should provide the hiring manager with the committee’s findings, based on the initial set of instructions.

The task of understanding how the committee’s final recommendations are to be brought forward to the hiring manager will vary. Typically, the search committee is asked to provide an unranked list of finalists with an in-depth assessment of strengths and areas for development. Occasionally, the search committee is instructed to rank candidates for the hiring manager, or even to make a hiring recommendation. It should be made very clear that the hiring manager is not bound by the committee’s ranking in making his or her selection. It should also be made clear that the hiring manager can reject any recommendations made by the committee if they are not satisfied with the final candidates. The committee may be instructed to start over if the applicant pool is not acceptable for any reason.

After receiving the search committee’s recommendations, the hiring manager has the right to conduct further investigation and evaluation of an applicant’s experience and/or qualifications, or reject the recommendations of the search committee and reopen the search.

Will the Committee or the Hiring Manager Check References and Verify Credentials?

This very important step should have been assigned by the hiring manager when s/he formally charged the search committee with their instructions/duties. Checking professional references and verifying all credentials, i.e., degree, certifications, licenses, are required before a recommendation to hire may be submitted to the Business Center Human Resources Office.

Preparing a Draft Letter of Offer

Unclassified Positions

When the hiring manager selects an applicant for an unclassified appointment, s/he MUST FIRST confirm that the applicant meets all of the required qualifications for the position before proceeding. Then, s/he may contact the applicant and make a verbal offer, being sure to make clear that the offer is contingent upon the Business Center Human Resources Office’s written approval. Salary, start date, and other conditions of employment can be negotiated at this point if they are consistent with the information approved on the posting for the position. If the conditions of employment are not consistent with the information approved on the posting, the hiring manager must contact the Business Center Human Resources Office to discuss his/her recommended terms and conditions of employment before an offer of employment can be negotiated. Promising specific terms and conditions of employment (i.e., the appointment salary) with an applicant before an appointment is approved can be DANGEROUS because the terms and conditions of employment offered may not be approved by OHR. The safe practice is for a hiring manager to make a verbal offer contingent upon review and approval of the offer by the Business Center Human Resources Office.

The hiring manager or the search administrator will create the draft offer letter and upload it to the Online Position Description and Recruiting System per the instructions in the User Guide for the Online PD and Recruiting System. Sample unclassified offer letters are available on the Office of Human Resources website to assist with the creation of offer letters. These sample letters are accessible at the OHR Employment Services, Recruitment and Selection Resources page.

Classified Positions

Hiring managers do not have permission to make a verbal offer of employment to an applicant before the appointment and offer letter are both approved by the Business Center Human Resources Office. The Collective Bargaining Agreement between the Oregon University System and SEIU, Local 503, OPEU entitles classified employees notified of a pending layoff the right to be placed into vacant positions for which they are qualified. See the Collective Bargaining Agreement for additional information.

Before the hiring manager or the search administrator can proceed with the creation of the draft offer letter, it must be determined that the applicant of choice meets ALL of the required minimum qualifications for the position.

The hiring manager or the search administrator will create the draft offer letter and upload it to the Online Position Description and Recruiting System per the instructions in the User Guide for the Online PD and Recruiting System. Sample classified offer letters are available on the Office of Human Resources website to assist with the creation of offer letters. These sample letters are accessible at the OHR Employment Services, Recruitment and Selection Resources page.

Sending a Written Offer of Employment to an Applicant

Once an offer letter is approved by the Business Center Human Resources Office, the hiring manager must sign the offer letter and send it to the applicant. In some cases, it may be reasonable to request that the offer letter be returned by a specific date.

If a position requires a background check, DMV check, or other licenses/certifications, the offer of employment will be contingent upon completion of the checks and verifications of the licenses/certifications. The employee CANNOT begin working in the position until these checks and verifications are completed with satisfactory results.

Securing US Work Authorization for Non-Resident Applicants after Acceptance of the Written Offer:

The process of obtaining work authorization varies in terms of time and complexity, depending upon the type of visa status for which the individual applicant is qualified. Once a candidate has accepted an offer, the Office of International Services (OIS) is available to work with departments/Schools/Colleges to secure US work authorization. All offer letters should state that the offer is contingent upon the ability to secure US work authorization. This paragraph is included in all offer letter templates.

Communicating with Applicants

Applicants should receive timely communication from the search committee chair to inform them of their status in a search process. The chair can contact applicants by phone, send them written letters, or ask the search administrator to use the email notification options in the online system to notify applicants.

Communicating With Applicants that WILL Be Invited to Interview

The search committee chair or search administrator should contact the applicants to be interviewed by telephone, by sending a letter in the mail, or email to schedule interviews. When applicants are contacted by telephone, they should be given the opportunity to speak directly to the OSU representative inviting them for an interview. If search committee chairs or administrators are not successful in reaching applicants by phone, the applicants should be notified by mail or email, and allowed a minimum of seven calendar days to respond to the invitation to interview. Written invitations to interview must include the date by which the applicants must respond to the invitation. It must also state that failure to respond by the deadline date will result in removal of the applicant’s name from the list of qualified applicants. Records indicating each applicant’s response to an invitation to interview must be maintained as part of the search file.

Communicating With Applicants that WILL NOT Be Invited to Interview

Applicants who were not selected for the first round of interviews should be informed of their status before moving forward with interviews. Applicants that may be interviewed at a later date should also be notified of their status in the search. Sample letter:

SAMPLE “No Interview” Letter to Applicants

Applicant
Address

Dear (Name):

Thank you for your interest in the (position title) position in the (department) at Oregon State University, and taking the time to submit your application information.

We received applications from many qualified individuals for this position opening. After reviewing the applications, we had to determine those individuals who would receive further consideration in our search process and those who would not. You were not among those selected for further consideration.

We sincerely appreciate the time and effort you dedicated to applying for this position and wish you success in your job search.

Sincerely,

Search Committee Chair Name

 

Use of Auto-Generated (No Interview) Emails in the Online PD and Recruiting System

There are two system auto-generated emails that may be used to notify applicants that they will NOT be invited to interview. System generated emails are impersonal, and it is NOT recommended that these emails be used unless the pool of applicants is so large that it would be unreasonable to send letters or phone each applicant to notify them of their status.

  • No Interview – Firm

Email Subject Line:  Status of Your Employment Application with Oregon State University

Email Content:   

Thank you for your interest in the following position at Oregon State University. We received applications from many qualified applicants for this position. The purpose of this message is to inform you that your application received full consideration, but you are not among those selected for further consideration.

(The following fields auto-populate from the posting):
Appointment Type:
Position Title:
Department:

Thank you.

  • Hold Status

Email Subject Line:  Status of Your Employment Application with Oregon State University

Email Content:   

Thank you for your interest in the following position at Oregon State University. The purpose of this message is to inform you that your application is still under consideration at this time.

(The following fields auto-populate from the posting):
Appointment Type:
Position Title:
Department:

Thank you.

Communication with applicants is a critical piece of the recruitment process.

Timely communication with applicants, to make them aware of their status in a search, results in positive experiences for our applicants, even when they may not be interviewed or selected for a position. It demonstrates that OSU cares that these applicants have taken their time to apply to our positions.

 

Sending Notification to Applicants Interviewed and Not Selected

Before an announcement of a new appointment is made, the other applicants that were interviewed but not selected should be notified in writing or by phone. The chair can contact applicants by phone, send them written letters, or ask the search administrator to use the email notification options in the online system to notify applicants. A sample letter is provided below.

SAMPLE “Interviewed – Not Selected” Letter to Applicants

Applicant
Address

Dear (Name):

Thank you for your interest in the (position title) position in the (department) at Oregon State University. On behalf of the search committee, I would like to thank you for taking the time to interview for this position.

At this time, I regret to inform you that you were not selected for this position. I encourage you to continue seeking employment at Oregon State University, and hope that you are successful in your future endeavors.

Sincerely,

Search Committee Chair Name

Use of Auto-Generated (Interviewed – Not Selected) Emails in the Online PD and Recruiting System

System generated emails are impersonal, and it is NOT recommended that these emails be used unless the pool of applicants is so large that it would be unreasonable to send letters or phone each applicant to notify them of their status. Auto-generated emails should never be sent to applicants until the hiring manager has a signed, accepted offer of employment from their applicant of choice. If for any reason the applicant of choice declines a written offer of employment, the committee may revisit the remaining applicants that interviewed for the position before making a decision to cancel or extend their search.

 

  • Interviewed – Not Selected

Email Subject Line:  Status of Your Employment Application with Oregon State University

Email Content:

Thank you for your interest in the following position at Oregon State University. We received applications from many qualified applicants for this position. On behalf of our committee, I wish to thank you for taking the time to interview for this position. After careful consideration of each candidate’s qualifications for the position, we have selected another candidate for the position.

 (The following fields auto-populate from the posting):
Appointment Type:
Position Title:
Department:

Thank you.

Communication with applicants is a critical piece of the recruitment process. Timely communication with applicants, to make them aware of their status in a search, results in positive experiences for our applicants, even when they may not be interviewed or selected for a position. It demonstrates that OSU cares that these applicants have taken their time to apply to our positions.

Integration and Orientation for New Employees

Hiring managers should create a comprehensive integration and orientation program to introduce their new employees to the university, college, and department. Several questions should drive what you do:

  1. What needs to be done to welcome the new employee in a way that affirms s/he made the right decision?
  2. What are the steps to fully integrate the new employee to the people, the job, your unit and the greater community over a 6 month timeframe?
  3. What does the new employee need to understand about OSU, your unit and you as the supervisor in order to succeed?

Refer to Inside OSU, an orientation guide for new employees and supervisors, as a resource.